Russia and U.S. on Collision Course Beyond Syria

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Peter1469
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Russia and U.S. on Collision Course Beyond Syria

Postby Peter1469 » Sun Oct 23, 2016 12:10 pm

Russia and U.S. on Collision Course Beyond Syria

A weak Russia plays the US for fools.

___

With the final stretch of the U.S. presidential elections upon us, Russia’s challenge in Syria has rapidly developed into a centerpiece of the foreign policy debate. The candidates need to formulate a clear vision of how to deal with Moscow.

Russian President Vladimir Putin has played a weak hand impressively. His nation’s economy is just a fraction of the United States’ 2016 gross domestic product of nearly $18 trillion; crucial components of its high-tech military are imported; and Russia has not projected power this far abroad since its withdrawal from Afghanistan, Cuba, and Vietnam at the end of the Cold War. (The Georgia war of 2008 and the Ukraine war of 2014 were within the borders of the former Soviet Union.)

Nevertheless, today Russia is giving the United States a run for its money: alleged cyberattacks against the Democratic National Committee; WikiLeaks interventions in the U.S. election campaign that rival Watergate; and the abrogation of crucial treaties, such as Conventional Forces in Europe.

We are witnessing the dismantling of the very foundations of U.S.-Russia relations that were laid down during the Soviet era, including arms control and nuclear non-proliferation -- the recent plutonium recycling treaty being the latest victim.

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Re: Russia and U.S. on Collision Course Beyond Syria

Postby Donttread » Sun Oct 23, 2016 1:34 pm

Peter1469 wrote:Russia and U.S. on Collision Course Beyond Syria

A weak Russia plays the US for fools.

___

With the final stretch of the U.S. presidential elections upon us, Russia’s challenge in Syria has rapidly developed into a centerpiece of the foreign policy debate. The candidates need to formulate a clear vision of how to deal with Moscow.

Russian President Vladimir Putin has played a weak hand impressively. His nation’s economy is just a fraction of the United States’ 2016 gross domestic product of nearly $18 trillion; crucial components of its high-tech military are imported; and Russia has not projected power this far abroad since its withdrawal from Afghanistan, Cuba, and Vietnam at the end of the Cold War. (The Georgia war of 2008 and the Ukraine war of 2014 were within the borders of the former Soviet Union.)

Nevertheless, today Russia is giving the United States a run for its money: alleged cyberattacks against the Democratic National Committee; WikiLeaks interventions in the U.S. election campaign that rival Watergate; and the abrogation of crucial treaties, such as Conventional Forces in Europe.

We are witnessing the dismantling of the very foundations of U.S.-Russia relations that were laid down during the Soviet era, including arms control and nuclear non-proliferation -- the recent plutonium recycling treaty being the latest victim.



Maybe if we had withdrawen from world interventionism at the end of the cold war to the whole world would be better off.

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Re: Russia and U.S. on Collision Course Beyond Syria

Postby Peter1469 » Sun Oct 23, 2016 1:37 pm

Donttread wrote:
Peter1469 wrote:Russia and U.S. on Collision Course Beyond Syria

A weak Russia plays the US for fools.

___

With the final stretch of the U.S. presidential elections upon us, Russia’s challenge in Syria has rapidly developed into a centerpiece of the foreign policy debate. The candidates need to formulate a clear vision of how to deal with Moscow.

Russian President Vladimir Putin has played a weak hand impressively. His nation’s economy is just a fraction of the United States’ 2016 gross domestic product of nearly $18 trillion; crucial components of its high-tech military are imported; and Russia has not projected power this far abroad since its withdrawal from Afghanistan, Cuba, and Vietnam at the end of the Cold War. (The Georgia war of 2008 and the Ukraine war of 2014 were within the borders of the former Soviet Union.)

Nevertheless, today Russia is giving the United States a run for its money: alleged cyberattacks against the Democratic National Committee; WikiLeaks interventions in the U.S. election campaign that rival Watergate; and the abrogation of crucial treaties, such as Conventional Forces in Europe.

We are witnessing the dismantling of the very foundations of U.S.-Russia relations that were laid down during the Soviet era, including arms control and nuclear non-proliferation -- the recent plutonium recycling treaty being the latest victim.



Maybe if we had withdrawen from world interventionism at the end of the cold war to the whole world would be better off.


I think we should have returned to great power politics. Ended the NATO alliance and let the great powers act in their own interests.


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